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Plot/Allergies•i-xii•1-317

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Page i

THE PLOT
AGAINST ASTHMA
AND ALLERGY
PATIENTS
Asthma, Allergies, Migraine, and Chronic
Fatigue Syndrome are Curable,

but the Cure Is Hidden
from the Patients

Felix Ravikovich, M.D.

As featured on CBC’s fifth estate

KOS
Publishing

BOOKS ON MEDICINE THAT WORKS

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Page ii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is my first and only literary child. It took nine long years to carry
it, and I would not have been able to deliver it without the support of several
people.
I want to pay tribute to the late Drs. Bayard Horton and Kenneth Melmon
for their fascination with histamine, their devotion to it, their research and
their belief that one day histamine will serve patients.
This book would not be possible without my wife Galina who is, actually,
my co-author. She conceived the idea and for two years, while I was fighting
in the courts, she worked on it alone, researched the medical sources collected
by me and began to put my ideas on paper. When I joined her, she became my
sounding board, the only knowledgeable person with whom I could share my
astonishing, at times dramatic discoveries made during my detective search of
medical literature. The situation forced her to immerse herself so deeply into
some of the most serious fields of medicine and science that by the end, she
became, albeit unofficially, the equivalent of a professional in clinical
immunology. Her background as a university professor enabled her to work
out how to present the most complicated material in the way digestible not
only for those who have a medical or biological education, but also for intellectuals with little or no such experience.
I express my love to my son Alex who was a comforting friend, whose
advice I sought in many critical situations during the process, and who
patiently corrected my imperfect English.
I would like to express my special thanks to Klemmens Fass, my unofficial
lawyer, who remained faithful to me when my other lawyers be; trayed me. He

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Page iii

Acknowledgments

refused outright to be paid for the long hours of discussions during the years
of my prosecution by the College. He also became my behind-the-stages law
teacher, and his advice helped me to go through all the stages of the legal
proceedings as well as the writing of this book.
I am grateful to Denise Crawford for her willingness to help with the
numerous technical and linguistic problems that I encountered through the
years of writing.
I appreciate the enormous work done by Isidor Zelinkovsky at the early
stages of my prosecution by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of
Ontario. He managed to get the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation interested in the histamine affair and persuaded them to give the opportunity to
my patients to tell their stories of their almost miraculous improvement and
outright recoveries with histamine therapy and the despair over losing it. The
program aired in Canada and in parts of U.S. created the necessary publicity,
which, in my opinion, contributed to my having not lost my license outright;
I was given a reprimand and forbidden to use histamine.
I am thankful to Ed Sprague, a patient who has become a close friend and
as such accompanied me to all of my meetings with the lawyers and through
the many stages of my trial as a silent witness. The numerous improprieties
he saw have changed his views on our justice system forever. Later on, he was
the most active organizer of press releases sent to the medical institutions,
media and government bodies of Ontario.
I cannot overestimate the tremendous support of Elizabeth and Daniel
Gamper that enabled me to go on with my work and book writing.
My gratitude goes to Tom Hirsch, my first literary agent, who became a
passionate advocate of histamine therapy and was willing to give up his fees
just to see this book published.
Last, but not the least, I thank Helke Ferrie who has dared to publish this
book. The people of Ontario should be grateful to her for the courage to fight
the medical regulatory authorities and for regularly publishing the facts about
the crimes committed by them against patients and doctors.
I am thankful to those of my patients who organized PRET (Patients’
Rights for Effective Treatment), a group that arranged the meeting at CBC’s fifth
estate television studio, demonstrated in front of the building which houses
the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, published and distributed
information on histamine therapy, attended the legal proceedings and kept
writing letters of support.

iii

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Page iv

Copyright © 2003 by Felix Ravikovich
All Rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever
without prior written permission from the publisher except in the case of brief quotations
embodied in review.
National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication
Ravikovich, Felix, 1938–
The plot against asthma and allergy patients: asthma, allergies, migraine, chronic
fatigue syndrome are curable, but the cure is hidden from patients / Felix Ravikovich.

Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 0-9731945-1-0

1. Allergy—Treatment. 2. Asthma—Treatment. 3. Medicine—Research. I. Title.
RC584.R39 2003

616.97'06

C2003-906757-2

Cover and text design/layout: Heidy Lawrance Associates
Printed in Canada on recycled paper

Published and distributed by
KOS Publishing Inc.
1997 Beechgrove Road,
Alton, ON Canada L0N 1A0
Tel: (519) 927-1049
Fax: (519) 927-9542
Quantity discounts available

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Page v

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgements
ii
Introduction by Helke Ferrie
vii
PART 1
Immune Mechanisms
1
PART 2
Causes and Triggers in Allergy
69
PART 3
Allergic Inflammation
98
PART 4
“Histaminegate”
106
PART 5
Medications
173
PART 6
Allergy Skin Testing and Immunotherapy
203
PART 7
Bronchial Asthma
238
PART 8
Diseases of Hypersensitivity
318
A. Chronic Rhinitis
B. Skin Allergies
C. Hay Fever
PART 9
Functional Encephalopathies
344
A. Vascular Headache
B. Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction
Syndrome
C. Depression
D. Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder
E. Irritable Bowel Syndrome
F. Other Histamine-Related Encephalopathies
Epilogue
“Eppur Si Mouve!”
387
Bibliography 390
Appendix
396
• Abstracts presented by Dr. F. Ravikovich at
international conferences and his article
• Letter by Dr. K. Melmon to Dr. F. Ravikovich
• Press release by the patients’ committee, PRET
• Notice to the reader
Index
408

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Introduction:
Renovating Medicine

“Practicing medicine without knowledge of biochemistry and
physiology is merely pop-gun pharmacy.”
Sir William Osler, 18901
“Far too large a section of the treatment of disease is today
controlled by the big manufacturing pharmacists, who have
enslaved us in a plausible pseudo-science.”
Sir William Osler, 1909

As the publisher and editor of this book it is an exceptional pleasure to be
asked to write an introduction to this most unusual work. Many readers who
know me from my regular articles on the politics of medicine published in
Vitality Magazine, Alive and others, share my conviction that the greatest
problem modern medicine faces in our time is the perverting influence of
political and corporate power on good medical practice and medical research.
To make medicine once again patient-centered, not patent-centered, and to
free medical research from corporate priorities, is the task of our time as
surely as it was the task in the 18th century to remove political power from
kings and put it into the hands of the people.
Indeed, the most profound insight I have experienced first as a medical
science writer, and now as a publisher of “Books on Medicine that Works,” is
the discovery that in virtually all areas of medicine the basic scientific breakthroughs achieved in the leading research institutions are rarely communicated to people, are very often not even taught to medical students, and are not
readily available to practicing doctors.

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viii THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

What IS readily available to everybody is information on yet another
supposedly miraculous drug which promises to alleviate the symptoms of any
known disease. Pick up any recent edition of Macleans Magazine, for example,
and attached to its outside you will find, courtesy of GlaxoSmithKline, in
dramatically colored red, white, and black a folder stating: “IMPORTANT
INFORMATION FOR PEOPLE WITH ASTHMA ENCLOSED.” A handy
little quiz inside allows the reader to be sure in seconds that he or she may
suffer from asthma more seriously than previously thought and that their
“asthma is not under control.” This message comes to you courtesy of
GlaxoSmithKline, the world’s largest producer of steroid puffers.
You are holding in your hands a book that, unlike the above advertisement,
really does contain important information for people suffering from asthma.
Dr. Ravikovich is fully familiar with the world-wide basic science research on
allergic diseases, successfully used a cure and reported on his results at international conferences. He also tells you why that cure is not generally known or
available. Here is the story of a doctor who fought for his patients.
This book provides the reader with a political revelation, a medical tour
de force, and a scientific detective story. It will take you into the world of the
immune system and its biochemistry and you will become thoroughly
familiar with the world’s leading medical journals and the medical research
into the bio-chemistry of the causes of asthma and allergic disease.
But this is also a shocking detective story: you will learn how those very
same medical researchers, who to this day are celebrated leaders in the
community of immunologists, mysteriously disavowed their own findings
and effectively betrayed patients worldwide as they bowed to corporate
agendas—for reasons best known to themselves. Although this seems unbelievable at first, it is not without precedent.
The same developments have been published with regard to cancer and
psychiatric illnesses. There, too, some of the leading researchers who had
discovered the underlying mechanisms of both areas of illness with the
potential cures for both, and had published their findings in the world’s most
prestigious science journals, What is significant here is to understand clearly,
that none of that research in allergy, cancer and psychiatry was superceded by
new findings, or in any way proven incorrect, or found to be a dead end for
scientific research. The astonishing revelations contained in this book are
supported by what happened in cancer and psychiatric research because in
those areas, the revival of all that useful medical research is beginning to

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Introduction

happen now. It is my fervent hope that this outstanding book will start the
same process of revival for asthma and allergy.
Today, the sell-out of medical practice to agendas that have nothing to do
with curing the sick, is nearly total. Patients are now referred to as
“consumers” who are encouraged to believe that they have “choices” of treatment offered in that enormous market of modern medicine run as a business.
It is as if illness has become an accepted life-style choice—right after the car
industry. After all, Pfizer is not only the world’s largest pharmaceutical corporation, but also the world’s second largest corporation. The representatives of
the drug companies are accepted as “stake-holders” in medicine to the point
where they are part of determining standards of practice, sit on the councils
of the medical licensing authorities, virtually control all medical research in
the absence of publicly funded research (but not in most of continental
Europe), and act as policy and fundraising staff for our political leaders.2
As for the business mantra of “consumer choice,” for the asthma and
allergy patient it’s basically steroids or steroids or steroids: mint flavored
syrups for kids, or laced with antibiotics (to cover all bases), or as shots, as
creams, and usually as the ever present puffer shaped as a toy for kids, handy
and pretty like a lipstick for the ladies. As for the cure, “profits can only be
harvested from chronic disease” a CEO of a pharmaceutical giant observed in
a recent shareholder’s meeting.3
But whose responsibility is it to fix this situation? Consider this then: The
world’s most prestigious science journal, Nature (March 28, 2002), ran an
article entitled “Can you believe what you read?” showing how the editors of
the most respected medical journals have begun to do some radical housecleaning when it became overwhelmingly apparent that published research
too often reflects corporate interests to the point of distorting the observed
facts. On June 27th 2002 Nature reported that even medical bio-ethicists are
now “being offered stock board positions, consulting contracts, research grants,
and even stock options” by pharmaceutical companies—and they accept
these goodies! Two international conferences were held in 2002 on conflicts
of interest in medicine (Atlanta and Warsaw). The former editor of the New
England Journal of Medicine, Marcia Angell, justly famous for her fearless
scrutiny of corruption in medicine, now works closely with the Center for
Science in the Public Interest (www.csip.org), a watchdog exposing unethical
behavior of doctors selling out to industry and industry’s false or self-servingly
incomplete product claims.

ix

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

Just how bad things have become can be measured by the fact that on
February 5 2002 the prestigious journal, Annals of Internal Medicine (vol. 136,
no. 3) and the UK’s famous Lancet simultaneously published the “Physicians
Charter” as a new manifesto to guide medicine (www.professionalism.org).
The charter asserts that it is time doctors get back to the basics. The Charter
reads like the Hippocratic Oath of 2,500 years ago translated in modern
English. The message is simple and blunt: don’t abuse your patients financially or sexually, don’t hurt them, let them chose among available treatments,
and treat them properly even if they are black, Jews, poor, retarded, dying, just
plain old, or don’t have any money, and don’t blab about them to others
without their consent. Central among all these ancient basics of medical
ethics was the admonishment that a doctor must not lie when you do research
because somebody offers to pay you for it. (The immunologists whose work is
discussed in this book would do well to read this Charter.) Wow! This document was prepared by an international team of medical ethicists for the international effort called the “Medical Professionalism Project.” It states at the
outset: “We share the view that medicine’s commitment to the patient is being
challenged by external forces of change” which “tempt physicians to forsake their
traditional commitment to the primacy of patients’ interests.”
So, that is what the international medical community admits, Dr. Ravikovich provides in this book evidence in support of this urgent need for a major
renovation of the House of Medicine and why that renovation must start with
doctors, after which the pharmaceutical industry is easily tamed.
This book is not simple. But neither is living with asthma, hives, irritable
bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue, constantly itchy skin, the annual round of
hay fever, or potentially fatal food allergies. The information in it is not “alternative”—the research is entirely mainstream. Here you will learn why you are
sick, why your standard treatments don’t work very well and make you sicker
through so-called side effects, how you could become healthy, or at the very
least greatly improved and get off drugs, and what you can do to help make
this healing treatment available.
This is no ordinary self-help book—indeed I wish it was. This book is a
crash course in asthma and allergy medicine designed to empower you with
knowledge and hopefully inspire you with a holy rage and the determination
to help bring out these facts so they become generally known to doctors and
patients alike.

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Introduction

A good book like this does not need my recommendation, but a quick
guided tour might help the reader who is new to this material. Thus, Part 1
provides the technical detail of how the immune system works, as is generally
agreed upon by scientists in this field. For the beginner Part 2 may serve as a
useful beginning; Part 5 will help patients understand why they are not
improving and what is known in mainstream pharmacology about these
drugs and their serious limitations and dangers. Part 4 has the provocative
title “Histaminegate” which refers intentionally to the Watergate scandal of
the 1970s. This chapter deserves the reader’s closest attention and is worth
reading with the greatest attention to detail. The remaining chapters provide
information on the various allergic diseases which will be of special interest
to different readers.
The Epilogue is something of a bombshell because it describes the most
recent publication on allergy research that came out only two weeks before
this book was submitted in its manuscript form to me. This research paper
fully validates everything you read in this book and returns to the research
that was more and more successfully hidden over the past two decades. The
politically significant fact of this development is that this was published by
the Swiss government’s research institution funded by tax money, not drug
companies. The equally important medical historical facts are that now “the
truth which was denied entrance through the door has forced its way in by the
window”—as the Russian proverb puts it and as Dr. Ravikovich is fond of
reminding us.
The Appendix contains documentation on the terrible struggle Dr.
Ravikovich became involved in when his life-saving treatment was attacked
by the medical licensing authorities, and suggestions are included on what
you, as the reader or friend of an asthma and allergy patient, can do to change
the current situation.
Treating asthma, allergy and related diseases successfully, at a fraction of
the current cost of mere limited symptom control, is an art and a science easily
learned by any interested doctor. There is currently a great deal of interest in
therapies that cure and are not merely symptom control methods generally
employed by the majority of physicians. What suffering patients often don’t
realize is how terrible the frustration of doctors is who wish to help but often
are prevented by the regulatory systems from employing new methods.

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

If doctors want this scientifically validated treatment approach to use, it
could be learned within a week or two. It is founded on basic science and as a
treatment validated through experience. However, here in Ontario the use of
histamine to treat asthma is literally forbidden since 1996 even though
blocking medical innovation and overruling patient choice is contrary to the
Medicine Act of Ontario and the Helsinki Accord on Human Rights which
Canada signed in 1988. This ban was ordered without a single item of
supporting scientific evidence and bypassed all mandatory debate required for
the formulation of medical standards of practice. You can change that. Read
this book and consider the information given in the Appendix and exercise
your rights as a citizen and as a patient.
Helke Ferrie

1. Michael Bliss, William Osler: A Life in Medicine, University of Toronto Press 1999
2. See The Olivieri Report, published by the Canadian Association of University
teachers, Lorimer, 2002. For cancer see S. Epstein, The Politics of Cancer Revisited,
1998, East Ridge Press. Epstein is one of the world’s leading oncologists known especially for his success in getting DDT banned and refocusing cancer research onto the
science of carcinogens. He is responsible for laws protecting workers from asbestos,
pesticides, radiation etc. throughout North America and the European Union. For
psychiatry see the new book by the world-renowned pharmacology scientists and
corporate whistleblower David Healey, Let Them Eat Prozac, Lorimer 2003,
published by the Canadian Association of University Teachers.
3. J. Robinson, Prescription Games: Money, Ego and Power Inside the Global
Pharmaceutical Industry, McClelland & Stewart, 2001.

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Page 1

PART ONE

IMMUNE MECHANISMS

CELLS
Almost a century and a half ago, a German scientist, Rudolf Virchow, made a
revolutionary discovery: the body is actually a “state” consisting of “citizens”—live cells, each of which is a perfectly balanced unit. A deviation from
the cellular balance is a disease, that is, lack of ease. Cells are our invisible
natural workforce and best health guardians. Therefore it is important to
understand what can go wrong with their complicated functioning, how to
help them restore their rhythmical work, and how to achieve this with
minimal introduction of suppressive medications.
What is a cell? It is a tiny basic operative unit of a live body. If we accept
Virchow’s view of our body as a “state,” then it is populated with over 100 trillion “citizens” working in coordination with each other. Our health and quality
of life depend totally on how our cells function. Cells have different colours,
sizes, and shapes and can be stationary or in motion. Under the membrane of
each cell, there is a chemical lab, and the chemicals it generates determine the
cellular function. Similar cells unite in teams to form tissues and organs.
Cellular teams work in unison, no matter where in the body they reside, and
produce the same chemicals at any given moment. A cell contains over a billion
molecules, and each carries specific chemical messages. Cells communicate
with each other in a cell-to-cell talk through these chemicals, just as we
communicate with words, spoken or written. The more chemicals a cell is able
to manufacture, the more “verbal” it is. Some cells perform limited local functions only, and their inner labs are fairly simple. Others are complex pharma-

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

ceuticals able to produce as many as 300,000 different
proteins: these cells perform numerous complex functions. The possibility of cloning an animal from just one
cell makes it clear how intricate its lab can be.
Cells are very “friendly” with one another. They lie
in close proximity, and if something is wrong with one
group, and it changes its chemistry, the neighbors
express their “sympathy” by changing their chemistry
as well. You definitely experienced it many times: your
boss yells at you, and your legs give way, your pulse
accelerates, your stomach turns into a knot, and you
are ready to rush to the washroom. All this happens
because the cells in your nerves, muscles, intestines,
vascular wall and endocrine glands identify with your
hurt feelings regulated by the brain cells. The opposite
happens when your satisfied or elated brain cells start
to release endorphins, natural narcotics, and the cells
all over the body respond by participating in the joy. You feel as if you can fly,
able to lift heavy objects and solve most difficult problems. This is what the
unity of the different departments of the body means.

ur body consists of
cells, which are tiny
chemical labs of various
complexities. The chemicals released by cells
are the language of
their communication.
They listen attentively
to each other’s talk, and
therefore, the work of
different groups of cells
is interrelated. This
makes the functioning
of the organs comprised
of these cells also
interrelated.

O

GENES
All cells comprise the same set of over 30,000 minuscule particles within its
nucleus. They are called genes. A gene is a biological unit of heredity that
passes certain physical characteristics from parents to their children. Genes
determine everything from such evident things as the eye colour, the voice
timbre or the height, to such imperceptible minutiae as actual operations of a
cellular lab. Every cellular chemical has its gene that governs its function.
Genes are behind each cellular operation and secretion. In their chemical
language, they instruct the cells what proteins and in what amount to produce
in particular situations. A cell’s performance depends on the performance of
the genes. The same genes work synchronically in all cells and send the
messages from within, and the genetic instructions influence the lab’s activity
qualitatively and quantitatively. If there is no genetic error or mutation
affecting the functioning of our cells, our health is good.
Nature is not faultless. Our dissatisfaction with something in our appearance is actually a reflection of how we perceive our visible genetic imperfec-

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Immune Mechanisms

tions. Health problems often reveal genetic imperfections hidden from the
eye. We may be born with genetic errors or may acquire them inexplicably in
the course of life or through exposure to a harmful factor—such as radiation,
toxic environment, etc. The term for genetic changes—mutation—comes
from the Latin mutare—to change. Defective genes send flawed messages to
the cellular lab, leading to the inappropriate production of the corresponding
chemicals. The resulting imbalanced chemistry means a disease in the organ
or system comprised of cells that produce this substance. Several genes or
even a group of them may be responsible for each
disease. Changes in DNA, the nucleic acid which is the
iny particles inside
carrier or genetic code, can be structural and funccells called genes are
tional. The latter means that the genes are, in princarriers of our heredity.
ciple, structurally normal, but have some “variations”
The genes govern
in their activity. This is of key importance for clinical
cellular functioning, and
medicine, since if only the genes’ functioning is
hence, chronic diseases
impaired, attempts to correct it can be successful. Not
are mainly the result of
by deleting and replacing them, as is planned in the
incorrect messages sent
current trend towards potentially dangerous genetic
to the cellular lab by
engineering, but by tuning them up instead.
faulty genes. Genetic
Once initiated, a genetic change is potentially
changes occur spontatransmissible, and may be passed by parents to their
neously or through the
children, grandchildren, etc. Genetic errors leading to
impact of external
health problems may be so subtle that their existence
factors and may be
remains unnoticed for years until time and/or strong
passed to future
effect deepen the hidden flaw. Doctors often see
generations. If the
parents that are taken aback when their child is diaggenetic faults are of a
nosed with asthma or other allergic disease that
functional, rather than
neither of them seems to have; it is the combination of
structural nature, mediparents’ genes that has amplified their own noncine has a chance to
apparent genetic errors in their offspring.
attempt a correction.

T

THE INTERRELATED FUNCTIONING OF
GENES AND CELLS
Each gene performs the same operation again and again. It is like a tiny
perpetual motor operating in a sophisticated machinery that includes the
interdependent work between the genes and the cells. The relationship of the
chemical lab and the genes that lie at the heart of each cell is not unilateral, as

3

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

it may seem. It is not simply a matter of the genes governing and the lab
obeying. Genes need “fuel” or “feedback” for their functioning, and certain
chemicals generated by the cellular lab itself play this role as do some chemicals coming from outside. Some activate the genes’ functioning, others inhibit
it. Genes can give proper instructions to the cells only when they get an
adequate “fuel supply.” Indeed, as Dr. Craig Venter, one of the two leaders of the
Genome Project, said on April 23, 2002 at the Gairdner Foundation International
Awards event, “proteins are the building structure of life, not genes.”
The understanding of the reciprocity in the functioning of the genes and
cells may turn the dream of medicine—safe and efficient genetic engineering
—into reality. Use of proper substances may gently correct the functioning of
the genes and hence, rectify their messages to the cells. These substances would
be genomodulators, and their effect upon the genes
he activity of the
would be genomodulation. To modulate means to adjust.
cellular lab and the
The Latin root modulare means to bring out characterisfunctioning of the genes
tics peculiar to a definite region; thus, genomodulation
are interdependent.
would mean a repair of genetic functioning to the
Moreover, cellular
normal level. Such type of “genetic engineering” would
production at large can
be non-invasive and safe. Since medicine does not use
affect the genes’
this sort of genomodulation, one would think that such
activity. Medicine can
proteins-modulators are not known or are commeruse this fact as the key
cially unavailable. Wrong. This book will discuss later
to access the genes if
two powerful genomodulators that work in harmony
their defects are only
with each other like a unit.
functional, not struc1. One is a chemical generated by the cells and
tural, and thus realize
released into extracellular space, also existing
safe “genetic engiin a form of a drug.
neering.” The use of a
2. The other is an intracellular enzyme.
well known synthetic
Both have been known for decades as messengers
version of a body’s
informing the cellular lab. If their harmonious work is
chemical triggers the
impaired, we may use a synthetic version of the first in
response of an intracelinjections, and it will naturally engage the other.
lular enzyme and
Numerous chronic conditions can improve or be cured
enables the latter to
by this. The improvement means that the genetic funcrestore the functioning
tioning in the patients treated this way was corrected
of impaired genes.
temporarily or for good.

T

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Page 5

Immune Mechanisms

IMMUNITY
ur immunity consists
Everybody knows that immunity is the body’s defence
of highly complex
against disease, but, among laymen, few are aware that groups of cells called
it is, actually, a defence realized by cells called immuno- immunocompetent cells.
competent. These cells are competent in recognizing the They work in coordinaenemy and producing the chemistry that protects the tion with each other and
host. We are born only with the seeds of immunity. The specialise to fight
fighting ability of immunocompetent cells is dormant different diseases. These
for the first several months of life. Exposure to an cells start to malfuncenemy “wakes them up.” Each exposure provides a chal- tion if the genes
lenge for them to specialize—to become competent in governing the immune
fighting a particular enemy. Some cells neutralize viruses response are mutated.
and bacteria, some fight cancer, others react to allergens
in those who are prone to allergic reactions. Each category of the specialized
cells performs its specific function. Thus, many groups of cells are united under
the concept of immunocompetence. Their coordinated work can be compared
to a well-rehearsed orchestra, and the released chemistry is the music.
Immunocompetent cells are located throughout the body. Certain genes
govern all aspects of their functioning. As was recognized a century ago,
immune diseases are the result of changes of the genes that govern all the
activity of the immune cells. The instructions of defective genes are, naturally,
defective, so are the kinds and the amounts of the chemicals liberated by these
cells. An error may turn the cellular music into a cacophony the way a poorly
tuned piano key can turn a concerto into a disaster. The uncoordinated music
of the immunocompetent orchestra means a poor defence against diseases,
no defence at all, or a distorted defence/reaction.

O

ENEMIES OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
We live in a world full of microorganisms that try to invade the body mainly
through our respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts and skin. These organisms
may cause a disease, but may also play a positive role in challenging our
immune system, causing the cells to produce defensive proteins and thus,
couching them how to defend us. We also have our inner “enemies” such as
excessive stress, hormonal changes due to puberty, pregnancy, menstrual
period, extreme temperature swings, etc., which require extra effort for the
body to adjust. When not in excess, an adjustment strengthens our immune
system, since the cells learn in the process what substances to produce and in

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

what amounts to deliver them. For example, the longer life span among
women compared to men is considered to be due to the frequent hormonal
challenges that strengthen their immune system.
However, our society has created numerous challenges that exceed the ability
of our immune system to resist them with success. Our food is full of colorants
and preservatives, some indicated on labels, others hidden. We breathe toxic
fumes and drink contaminated water. We feed the cattle and chicken with
antibiotics and hormones that speed their growth. We
enes malfunction
even legalize the hazardous effects of these drugs by
due to inborn errors
allowing their “permissible” amount in meat and
or those acquired in the
poultry. Cattle are fed grass and grain treated with fertilprocesses of life. Their
izers, and we allow a certain amount of these poisons in
functioning may also
canned goods that use dairy and meat products. To
change under the influcompound our problems, we often take medications
ence of extreme envibecause we do not want to tolerate a slight discomfort,
ronmental factors.
even for a short period of time, and easily find a doctor
Genetic changes are
willing to write out a prescription. The respect of the
called mutations.
society to drugs is so high that we write them with capital
Mutations create a
letters. We are forced into vaccinating our children
predisposition to cellular
although the generally accepted “hygiene” theory by S.
malfunctioning, since
Romagnani recognizes that the increased exposure to
flawed genes send
vaccinations is among the factors contributing to the
wrong signals to the
spread of allergies and asthma.1
cells they govern.
Social pressures in our competitive society are also
important health hazards. Our biological evolution has
not caught up with the fast pace of “civilization” and its stressful and
sustained emotional factors that contribute to the destruction of our great
defender—the immune system. This destruction starts with the genes that
govern the “pharmaceutical lab” of immunocompetent cells. Apart from
accumulating unfavourable external conditions that affect our genes, their
malfunctioning and/or mutation may occur spontaneously in the course of
life, without any obvious reason.

G

ALLERGY AS A CELLULAR OVERREACTION
The very term allergy indicates that a patient’s body functions differently
from a normal body: Greek allos means other, while ergon means work. Like
an abused child who snaps at suspects an enemy even in a friendly stranger,

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Immune Mechanisms

an immune system governed by impaired genes sees enemies not only in
viruses, bacteria or cancer cells but in the things and events which would leave
a healthy immune system undisturbed. It may “snap”
mmunocompetent
at a pollen particle, fur/dander of a pet, a favorite
cells genetically
food, the texture of fancy underwear, a pleasant
scent of a perfume, a weather change, a mood fluctu- predisposed to malfuncation or a natural rise or fall in one’s own hormonal tioning are hypersensilevels. The cells may also “overreact” without any tive and may overreact
challenge, that is, spontaneously, which means that spontaneously without
they start releasing certain chemicals in disproportional a trigger, or react to a
amounts. Such chemical overreaction of immuno- friendly environment by
competent cells is called hypersensitivity or hyper- releasing wrong chemistry. This brings on
releasability.
Allergies are genetically predetermined. They start allergy symptoms. Only
with the malfunctioning of the regulatory genes those people whose
responsible for the balanced work of the allergy depart- genes are mutated have
ment of the immune system. Genetic predisposition is chronic allergic
the primary dominant factor in the production of diseases. Exposure to a
allergic diseases, while the environment may become a harmful environment
complimentary factor. In the absence of genetic muta- may only augment the
tion, the effect of the environment is mostly temporary genetic defect and
and leads to acute reactions and temporary symptoms, through this lead to
not to chronic allergic diseases. This explains why hyperreleasability of the
some people develop lasting allergy symptoms upon immunocompetent cells.
a certain exposure, while others get away with an
acute episode.
A slight genetic defect, mostly inherited, occasionally acquired, may remain
unnoticed for years. However, time itself and/or cumulative effects of the
hazards may “break the back of the camel.” In other words, the initial small
defect in the genes may become magnified, and as a result, the operation guided
by these genes may cause the cells to respond with a pathological reaction to
what they would have perceived as harmless before. Since the language of the
cells is their dynamic chemistry, the malfunctioning immunocompetent cells
speak in chemically improper syntax and thus produce the signs of disease.
Conventional allergy dwells on the environment as allergy cause and
rarely spells out the fact that a trigger may provoke a recurrent allergic disease
only in people with the underlying genetic defects or predisposition. Allergic

I

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

reactions without any trigger are also left unexplained. This deflects attention
from primary errors to secondary events.

IS TREATMENT OF ALLERGIES ON THE GENETIC
LEVEL FEASIBLE?
Knowledge of the alphabet is not sufficient to enable one to combine the
letters into words, and words into sentences. In a similar way, we cannot say
that the current listing of about 30,000 genes gives us the knowledge of their
functions and, most importantly, their interrelations, not to mention, the
patterns of their manipulations. The understanding that genetic malfunctioning lies at the core of allergies means that its correction would be the best
possible treatment for diseases of hypersensitivities. The interrelationship of
genes responsible for one single disease, as well as their interrelationship with
the rest of the genome, are extremely complex processes and may never be
fully understood. Besides, the procedure of correcting or replacing flawed
genes is technically very complicated, and is, therefore, as the leading geneticists say, many years away. Francis Collins, head of the Human Genome
Project of the National Institutes of Health, predicts, that by 2010, we may
have about 25 tests for genetic predisposition to about 25 major causes of
diseases and death. Diagnostic tests, not therapies! One ought to think also
about the many possible physiological, moral, and ethical issues involved in
such therapies.
There is another obstacle. Rationing of knowledge is common in modern
medicine, and drug companies have already started battling over patenting
the genome discoveries. Drugs or new methods of genetic therapy can rightly
be considered discoveries, but the industry wants to patent that knowledge!
Imagine what would have happened if the inventors of alphabets had decided
to patent the letters. If the industry finds support for this plan from our
corrupt governments, the possibility of genetic cures will be moved to still
further into the future. Another problem is related to the enormous amount
of money needed to fund the development of procedures for the intricate
process of penetrating genes. Thus, as an every day treatment, genetic engineering is not feasible, even theoretically, in the near future. Fortunately, allergies and asthma, although multigenic and multifactorial diseases, arise mostly
not from structurally defective genes but from deviations in the genes’ functioning. This means that in order to reverse an allergic disease, we need only
to “tune up” these genes. The fact that in allergies, the performance of the

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governing genes is correctable should make medicine happy. More so because
the prevalence of allergy and asthma grows rapidly.

HOMEOSTASIS
To understand how medicine can “tune up” the body and help it to reverse
allergies on its own, we must understand a basic law of nature—homeostasis.
The word consists of two roots: home(o)—sameness and stasis—standing, and
thus, the term denotes the tendency to preserve a balance. Nature strives for
harmony and endowed us with delicate self-regulatory systems. Whenever
unfavourable forces affect our body, these systems are challenged and, without our
awareness, adjust to the changes, thus protecting us. For
example, exposure to cold causes shivering, which is
he body functions
the body’s way of warming up, while exposure to hot
normally when all the
weather automatically causes profuse sweating that
cellular substances are
prevents overheating. Both the warming and the
produced in balanced
cooling are achieved through spontaneous changes in
amounts. A healthy body
the cellular chemistry.
possesses regulatory
Look how clever the body deals with dieting: after
tools through which it
an initial weight loss, the metabolism slows down to
corrects imbalances.
make better use of the smaller amount of food the
The main condition
dieter consumes. In fact, weight loss may practically
under which the immune
stop despite the reduced food intake. While this may
system functions
upset dieters, our metabolism is “computerized” to
normally is a homeohelp the body to survive during food-deficient times.
static production of all
Another example: if you eat a lot of sweets, the
chemicals by the
high level of blood sugar mimics the condition of
immunocompetent cells.
diabetes and may lead to metabolic changes. To
prevent complications, the body has a mechanism to cope with the dangerous
excess: the insulin-producing gland gets the instruction to increase its output
to metabolize the sugar.
Any deviation from the norm, be it a deficit or a surplus, may be equally
harmful, and these examples show that a healthy body self-rectifies such
changes through its protective autoregulatory switches governing all functions. The tendency towards maintaining equilibrium, no matter whether it is
body temperature, blood pressure or hormone production or, in fact, production of any chemical, is an inborn feature that keeps the body alive and is a part
of the universal law of homeostasis.

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

Homeostasis is the core of immune system functioning. Health is balanced
cellular production of all chemicals, or harmonious cellular functioning. Each
time our immune system fights an invader, its only task is to restore the
balanced production of chemicals by immunocompetent cells. Unlike other
immune-related chronic diseases, allergies and asthma are much more easily
reversible because permanent changes in the tissues’ interior occur only in the
very advanced stages. The spontaneity of relapses and remissions in allergies
and asthma indicates that it is possible to restore the functioning of the
immunocompetent cells involved in them because the mutation of the underlying genes is only functional.

CELLULAR RECEPTORS
What are the tools through which a healthy body regulates the production of all of its substances? Knowing
them in general, we could probably find the ailing regulatory tools in allergy patients, repair them and help
these people. The instruments through which the body
establishes homeostatic amounts of cellular secretions
are cellular receptors, which all cells have either on the
surface of the cell membrane, or inside the cell itself.
Receptors are molecules of protein that work like
antenna, each very selective in their response to the
surrounding environment. Each type of receptor is
tuned to a certain signal. Some discern a signal of pain,
others of temperature, sound, color, a specific chemical
substance, etc. Signals come in the form of chemicals,
the language of the cells. Each receptor selectively binds
to a specific substance, or picks up the information
contained in a physical stimulus, and then dispatches
the obtained information to the cellular lab. The received signals affect the
manufacturing process in the inner cellular lab. The information travels with
a lightning-like speed. The more complex the cellular lab, the more varied its
receptors are. Different groups of cells may have the same type of receptors
and hence, respond to the same signal by changing their chemistry in tandem.
Intracellular signaling followed by chemical effects is called signal transduction, while cell-to-cell talk is signal transmission. The development and
activity of all cellular receptors are determined by genes.

ells have various
receptors, and each
kind senses specific
stimuli and/or chemical
messages. The receptors
then change chemically
in response to the stimulus or bind to the
substances that carry
these messages and
pass the “digested”
information to the inner
lab for production of
certain chemicals and
hence, physiological
effects.

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Immune Mechanisms

A cell with its receptors can be compared to an insect whose antenna detect
signals from its peers or the environment. In response to a stimulus, a signal,
the insect’s body produces certain chemicals, and that changed chemistry
conveys a message for action. The signal may prompt the insect’s body to
exude venom to repel/kill an enemy or to secrete pheromones specific to the
situation: to alert its peers of a danger, to attract an insect of the opposite sex,
to call for help. Similarly, receptors are conductors of such cellular messages.
Imagine an insect with its antennas severed: all its communication with the peer
community and the environment are is cut off, and the insect is doomed to die.
Similarly, the cell’s ability to synthesize and release chemicals depends on its
receptor functioning and our health depends on proper receptor functioning.

RECEPTORS AS SWITCHES
A cell is a generator of chemicals, and like any generator, it is supposed to have switches to turn the
he body corrects any
processes on or off. An immunocompetent cell
unbalanced cellular
synthesizes numerous chemicals and has switches for
production through
each of the chemicals it generates. Cellular receptors
receptors that work like
play the roles of switches that intensify or temper the
turn-on and turn-off
cellular production process. To make sure that the
switches. Every cellular
cell produces just the right amount of a particular
chemical is regulated by
substance, there are receptors that switch on its
its specific receptors,
release and other receptors that switch it off. Each
and like switches, they
cellular switch works within a range. The regulation
adjust production to
is implemented the same way the temperature of an
cellular norm. Only propiron is increased or reduced by turning the lever,
erly working on/off
depending on the type of the fabric being pressed.
switches provide the
Proper control over the synthesis and release of
correct release of each
chemicals is vital because both excess and deficit can
cellular chemical.
lead to disease, as is, for instance, the case of a coma
resulting from blood sugar excess or its shortage.
Each receptor type is tuned to a certain chemical. Cells “measure” the
amount of this chemical in the surrounding space with their receptors in the
same way that an insect’s antenna senses the environment for specific signals
and then passes its message to the inner lab. The lab responds accordingly
either with intensification or inhibition of the release. This receptor-mediated
process goes on incessantly.

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

nly well developed
receptors are able
to sense and correct the
release of cellular chemicals by increasing or
decreasing their production. If one kind of
receptor is inefficient,
the cells release the
chemicals according to
the signals of its opposite. Thus, the inefficiency of a turn-off
receptor type leads to
the predominance of the
chemistry generated
by its rival turn-on
receptor. None of the
current allergy medications repairs the prime
defect—inefficient
receptors—they do not
restore the protective
ability of the immune
system. Instead, all of
them block the activity
of the efficient receptors.

O

If a certain receptor type, say an off switch, is inefficient, its counterpart, the on switch, works unopposed. This can make the cell generate so much of a
chemical that it inundates the tissues and leads to
disease. Only efficient on/off receptors can provide
balanced output.

RECEPTOR EFFICIENCY DETERMINS PROPER
CELLULAR WORK
In the same way a high grade TV antenna determines
the number of stations and the quality of the image,
cellular receptors provide a proper message transmission. For adequate cellular functioning, both the quantity and the quality of receptors are important: the cells
should have enough cellular receptors, and these
should be well developed. Scarce, underdeveloped or
inefficient receptors cannot adequately discern signals,
nor can they transmit coherent information to the
interior of the cellular lab.
As was said, the operation of any on-switch must be
counterbalanced by the off-switch. An example is a
warm shower: only functional taps can provide one.
Otherwise, we would have either cold or hot water
only. In every-day life, nobody tries to resolve the
problem of a broken cold water tap by reducing the
flow from the hot tap. It is the broken tap that needs to
be repaired. Every-day logic that prompts us to fix the
broken tap, fails when it comes to fixing our health.
Here is proof.
The immune system is designed as a self-regulatory machinery, and allergies are among self-regulatory diseases. This knowledge allows us to develop
medications that will stimulate or block receptors depending on the purpose.
Medications can relieve the symptoms either by blocking the active healthy
receptors or by stimulating the inactive ones. Activation of the inefficient tool
is preferable since it not only rectifies the primary defect but also preserves
the integrity of the rest of functioning system. Strangely, drugs designed to
stimulate deficient responses are a rarity in medicine in general and are

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Immune Mechanisms

absent in allergy, but allergy therapy concentrates primarily on blocking the
active, normal (!) responses. Logically, help should come in the form of facilitating the repair of the primary defect. But conventional allergy practice
completely disregards this simple logic and uses only suppressors.

CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT OF ALLERGIES
Each organ with unhealthy immunocompetent cells expresses its malfunctioning through the symptoms typical of its specific nature. Thus, the lower
respiratory tract expresses its disease through cough and bronchial obstruction;
a runny/stuffy nose is a sign of the affliction of the nasal lining, while itch and
rash indicate the involvement of the skin. Two kinds of medications are used to
treat allergies. The purpose of both is symptomatic relief, not cure. These are
symptomatic drugs that target the end organ—bronchi, nasal passages, skin,
etc. They are supposed to block the release of the “bad” chemistry that causes
the symptoms and thus to relieve bronchial obstruction, an itch or a nasal
congestion. Actually, the “bad” chemistry is secondary to the primary cause
which is the deficient turn-off receptors, but unfortunately the restoration of
their activity with proper stimulants never becomes the treatment target. Given
the fact of the mutated genes causing the harmful functioning of the flawed receptors, allergy patients are doomed to perpetual medicalization and regular visits to
medical offices. Moreover, the suppression of the excessive release fails too often,
and then other drugs are prescribed. These not only attempt to reduce the effect
of the “bad” chemistry, but suppress all the processes in the cellular lab, bad and
good, and that is why they are called immunosuppressants. Worse yet, even at
the cost of cellular suppression, these medications provide only temporary
relief, because they do not eliminate the cause of the malfunction in the cells,
but merely suppress all the work of the cellular lab. This suppression covers all
immunocompetent cells, and their protective functions are also shut down.
These medications suppress the functioning of the cells far beyond the immune
system, and thus, these side effects greatly overshadow even their apparent shortterm benefits once taken for a long period. Of course, allergy is a chronic disease,
and so these medications are often taken daily, which undermines the body’s
entire immunity in addition to all those side effects. The immunocompetent
cells, already compromised by the pre-existing genetic malfunctioning, lose
their innate ability to produce their protective chemistry. This deprives the
patient consuming the drug of most immune defences and, hence, severely
affects the course of the allergic illness for which the drugs are prescribed.

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odern allergy therapy focuses on the
end organ by blocking
the natural on-receptors
responsible for the overproduction of those
substances which, in
excess, cause the symptoms. Most commonly,
and especially in
asthma, it uses immunosuppressive medications
that allegedly target the
“bad” chemistry, but in
reality suppress the
work of all immunocompetent cells. Blocking is
too often inefficient.
Suppression destroys
the cellular ability to
produce protective
chemistry, which results
in the generally undermined immunity, and, in
the long run, worsening
of the primary disease
and/or other side
effects of various kinds
and severity. Neither
approach aims to
restore the functioning
of the immune system
and by that, resolve the
allergy problem.

M

In general, we often learn about drugs’ side effects
only when the fatalities from their consumption rise too
high to be ignored. Such drugs are taken off pharmacy
shelves, replaced by others, allegedly safer products, and
only time exposes the adverse effects of those newer
products. In allergies and especially in asthma, immunosuppressive medications are, however, the only effective
ones, and allergists try to reduce the side effects of these
widely prescribed drugs. Adverse effects are rarely
discussed in medical sources and are usually missing
from medical textbooks as well. No wonder, that in the
long run, the course of the disease, for which these
medications are prescribed, becomes worse.
Napoleon Bonaparte is said to have remarked:
“Doctors will have more lives to answer for in the next
world than even we generals.”

T-CELLS
Any discussion of a self-regulatory disease should start
with the commanders of the immune cells. They are
the T-cells or T-lymphocytes. These cells are a nature’s
masterpiece. The verbs used to define the T-cells’ role
in immune response and function affirm that they
initiate, propagate and orchestrate all immune reactions. T-cells mainly direct the battles by telling other
immunocompetent cells what chemicals to generate
and in what amounts. They also most actively participate in all processes where their subordinates are
involved, and immediately respond to the messages
coming from other cells. Various chemicals signal these
commands and responses.
T-cells possess a unique ability to learn how to
participate in immune reactions and govern them. At
first, these cells are “naïve.” In a medical context this
word is used to describe the fact that an immune cell
has not yet been exposed to invaders and, therefore, has not yet had a chance
to express its fighting potential. Exposure to a virus, microbe, or any other

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intruder provides the cell with information that causes it to become “educated.”
This activation signifies the beginning of their specialization in the corresponding field. The process continues with repeated exposure to the trigger
in a way similar to muscle training when exercise results in a corresponding
muscle development.
Allergy is a deviation from the norm. T-cells are supposed to be our
protectors, but in the allergic patient they lack their regulatory ability. This
creates the background for an exaggerated activity of
-cells are central to
the subordinate immune cells, now promoting disease.
immunity. They
In allergy-prone people, any foreign substance or any
specialize
in fighting
unspecified event may become a trigger of a diseasepromoting immune response. T-cells called different diseases. After
T-helpers (TH1 and TH2) now unfortunately “help” to an encounter with an
invader, which they
produce chemicals promoting the allergic response.
The only other subdivision of T-cells that never perceive as an enemy,
fails us and stays in the disease fighting mode are the they retain memory of
T-suppressors. T-suppressors get activated simulta- what chemicals to
neously and in response to the activity of all other produce for any future
helper cells. In the ’70s, the term was introduced that fight. In allergy, there
labeled suppressors as T-suppressor regulatory cells are two natural opposing
denoting that they regulate all responses, especially in subdivisions of T-cells—
allergies.2 Suppressors moderate not only the host- helpers that are mainly
hostile activity of helpers, but also the disease- on the diseasepromoting activity of other immunocompetent cells. promoting side, and
In the process of maturation, all T-cells, T-suppressors suppressors that funcand both kinds of T helpers, become memory T-cells. tion to promote health
This means, that like the brain, they remember how to and also control the
participate in the fight by releasing certain chemicals work of T-helpers. Both
characteristic for their and activities in promoting or kinds of cells, once
specialised, become
suppressing disease.
memory cells and
remember how to fight
T-SUPPRESSORS
T-suppressors are our protectors in the immune for or against the
system’s war we call allergy. Their overall activity disease.

T

determines whether allergy will or will not take place.
The conclusion is that if one has allergy symptoms, T-suppressors are for some
reason insufficient. Interestingly, since 1991, discussion of these cells, central for

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allergic processes, has disappeared from medical sources
on allergy, even though, of course, these cells are still
present and doing their work as they always have done.
At the same time, the same publications describe in
detail helpers, TH1 and TH2, which are subordinate to
T-suppressors. A legitimate question is: why?
There can be only one logical explanation for this:
by removing the protectors, T-suppressors, from the
stage, the discussion now centers only on the diseasepromoting T-helpers. By not discussing the role of
T-suppressors, which restore the body’s disease-fighting
ability, the unlimited use of various medications is justified. By acting as if T-suppressors are not significant,
the human body is portrayed by medical science as if it
was unable to regain its disease-fighting ability. This,
view justifies the unlimited use of various medications,
including very potent ones. The most frightening fact
is that, along with controlling the disease-promoting
activity of the immune cells, these drugs collaterally
also crush the activity of our saviours, T-suppressors.
While the symptoms may temporarily be controlled,
the price for this temporary relief may be the obliteration of our T-suppressors and thus also their ability to
fight for us against disease. The fact that T-suppressors
are ignored in medical discussion is, from a scientific point of view, incomprehensible; it was science that discovered them and elucidated their activity.
Ignoring T-suppressors also contradicts the laws of homeostasis upon which
a functioning immune system depends, namely that disease-promoting action
always also stimulates the disease-fighting forces, in order to defend the host.

-suppressors are
controllers of all
allergy-related immune
responses, and their
activity and memory are
the keys to the normal
functioning of all participating cells. Inability of
T-suppressors to control
T-helpers and organize
the defence against
them explains allergy
symptoms. Inexplicably,
during the ’90s, these
cells have practically
disappeared from all
allergy-related scientific
publications, which
creates the false view
of our immunity as a
system ruled and operated totally by negative
forces.

T

MAST CELLS
Among the closest subordinates of T-cells, two kinds play a special part in
allergic reactions. They are sister cells—stationary mast cells and mobile
basophils. Mast cells reside in tissues, while basophils flow with blood. Due
to the similarity of their functions, when speaking about mast cells, we imply
basophils as well, even though they enter an allergic reaction at different
stages.

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If T-cells are the conductors of the orchestra of allergy-participating cells,
mast cells are the lead instrument. Their leading role indicates that all the
properties of mast cells and basophils are realized in allergy as in no other
disease. They start and maintain allergic reactions. Mast cells are major generators of chemicals in allergic reactions. The word mast comes from the
German verb to feed, thereby indicating that these cells “feed” the immune
processes with their abundant chemistry, which then provides for the various
immune reactions.
The most important and prolific chemical among them is histamine.
Although histamine has been known for almost a century as a cellular chemical, in 1952, it was discovered to be a product of the mast cells. Since then, it
has always been emphasized in all textbooks and medical dictionaries as the
most distinctive feature of these cells and allergic diseases. Each mast cell
contains 50–200 histamine granules densely packed under the cellular
membrane. Mast cells are very “touchy” in general, but especially in allergy
patients: upon certain chemical changes in the surrounding space, the granules crack like fragile egg shells and leak out histamine. This act is called
degranulation. Histamine leaks abundantly in many diseases where there is
an infectious or immune-related inflammation, or an injury. However, in
allergies, mast cell release of histamine is especially profuse, and, therefore,
histamine release is accepted as the start and the hallmark of allergic reactions. In humans, histamine is the only pre-stored mediator that participates in
allergic reactions; it causes initial activation of all immune cells participating
in allergy, and it changes their chemistry. Because mast cells concentrate in
the skin, air passages, brain, gastrointestinal tract, histamine spill occurs
predominantly in these areas. Mast cells initiate allergic reactions by overspilling histamine, while their sister cells, basophils, take over at a delayed
stage and maintain the process. Their histamine production constitutes about
90% of all histamine released. While mast cells can produce numerous mediators of allergy, apart from histamine, basophils produce mainly histamine.
The hyperresponsiveness of mast cells and basophils, and their exaggerated
release of histamine, as the major driving force, allows us to call allergies
diseases of hypersensitivity. The mast cells’ hyperactivity in releasing histamine
is a sign of the person’s inborn predisposition to allergy, which means that
certain genes governing the function of these cells are faulty.
In his work on mast cells and basophils, Dr. L. Lichtenstein, the pioneer of
histamine research, and the 1994 president of the American Academy of

17

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THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

ast cells and
basophils are the
cells that unleash and
maintain allergic reactions. Their central
feature is the presence of
histamine granules under
the membrane. In allergy
patients, these cells are
abnormally sensitive and
may release excessive
amounts of histamine in
response to virtually any
trigger and do so spontaneously. The histamine
spill ignites allergic reactions. Uncontrollable
release of histamine from
these cells is a genetically
predetermined feature
and is a major indicator
that the host has allergies. The exaggerated
histamine release from
mast cells and basophils is
the key event in allergy,
which clinical and even
theoretical allergy medicine now basically ignores.

M

Allergy and Immunology (AAAI), reaffirmed this idea
in his presidential address published in the most prestigious immunological periodical.3 To the present day,
this concept has not been rejected or even questioned.
However, in the latest medical sources histamine
leakage at early and late stages of allergic reaction is
described solely under the unrevealing mast cell
releasability or mast cell degranulation, activation, or
recruitment, with the word histamine always omitted.
At the same time, the names of other, qualitatively and
quantitatively inferior mediators of allergy are emphasized. In this way, the impression is created that mast
cells are disconnected from their central product,
histamine, and, thereby, their role in allergic reactions
appears as seemingly insignificant. Instead, what is put
forward as significant are other cells that neither
initiate allergic reactions nor keep the allergic response
going, or/and enter the game only in response to a
histamine spill at much later stages. This conceals the
inseparability of mast cells and basophils from histamine granules as their most characteristic feature, and
deflects attention from the fact that a massive histamine spill signals the onset of allergic symptoms and
maintains these at later stages.

DENDRITIC CELLS
The third type of cells important in allergies is the
dendritic cell. The name dendritic comes from the Greek
tree. Indeed, threadlike extensions of dendritic cells
resemble a branched tree—the image that inspired their
name. These cells’ “secretory products are more diverse
than those known for any other cells of the immune system,” states the leading
medical textbook on internal medicine.4 There are several types of dendritic
cells, and they densely populate the skin, the lungs, the lymph nodes, and the
nasal mucosa. One kind is of particular interest for us because of its regulatory
activity in immune processes, its ability to affect the performance of T-cells, and
its cardinal role in skin allergies and related skin conditions. These are Langer-

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Immune Mechanisms

hans cells, or simply LCs. These cells are a repository of numerous chemicals,
histamine among them. They bind to the intruder and present it to T-cells for
identification and action. LCs also possess the unique migratory ability of traveling from the skin to the regional lymph nodes and inform T-cells of the presence of intruders encountered on the skin or in the air passages. In addition, the
changing chemistry of LCs following their encounter
mong immunocomwith an intruder, can directly involve other immunopetent cells, there is
competent cells. LCs have another unique feature—
affinity with nerve cells, which also belong to the family the family of dendritic
of dendrites. The extensions from LCs stretch to the cells. One type,
dendrites of nerve cells, thus forming their continua- Langerhans cell or LCs,
tion. These connections, as well as the cells’ reciprocal are especially important
chemistry, become the bridges for their communica- in allergy. They densely
tion. The involvement of LCs on the skin inevitably populate the skin, while
leads to the involvement of the nerve cells and vice versa. other members of the
Skin diseases of neurological origin, such as psoriasis or dendrite family reside
neurodermatitis, are the best examples of the ties and all over the body. Upon
interdependent functioning of the immune and an encounter with an
enemy, LCs bind to it
nervous systems in the body.
and present it to T-cells,
thus activating them.
HISTAMINE
Since all allergic reactions start and continue with a Dendritic cells have a
histamine spill, histamine will become central to this special affinity to nerve
book. Practically speaking, allergies and asthma are cells, which are also
diseases of one substance—histamine. When a person dendrites, hence the
does not have allergies, histamine release in that easy involvement of
person’s immunocompetent cells is balanced. That is both in each other’s
activities.
why it is so important to clarify what histamine is.

A

The word histamine is made up of two Greek
roots: histios meaning pertaining to tissue and amino denoting a chemical group, an integral constituent of all proteins. Histamine is a compound
found in different concentrations in all body tissues. It is an active participant
in all health-promoting as well as all disease-promoting processes. Its
precursor is histidine, one of the nine essential amino acids. The term essential in regard to amino acids denotes that it is one of the nine compounds
without which there is no life. Being similar to all essential amino acids, histidine cannot be synthesized by humans and is obtained only from food. In the

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20 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

body, it naturally transforms into histamine. Numerous food proteins contain
a different inherent amount of this histamine’s predecessor. Especially rich are
seafood, certain fish and meats (mackerel, sole, pork), cheeses, red wines,
chocolate, citrus fruits, nuts, beer. Consumption of such foods leads to
increased formation of histamine, and therefore, hypersensitive people often
have an allergic reaction after eating them.
Like everything in the body, the innate histamine concentration in tissues
is genetically predetermined. This is highly individual and also fluctuates
depending on the physiologic state of the body at any given moment. The
increasing histamine concentration in tissues may occur due to the overreaction of its main repository—the mast cells—to their internal environment.
That is why allergy symptoms may instantaneously flare up upon the slightest
change in the body’s chemistry. Such changes may occur when a person sleeps
less or more than usual, gets warm or cold, or even when a sudden mood
change takes place. Sometimes, histamine overspill may occur without any
trigger at all, simply spontaneously.

WHAT HISTAMINE DOES IN THE BODY
In normal body functioning, although pre-stored mainly in mast cells and
basophils, all immunocompetent cells contain histamine. Moreover, they start
to synthesize it de novo upon activation, and this makes histamine the most
important messenger in immune processes or, as science calls it, a mediator,
in all aspects of immune function. Nerve cells and endocrine cells also synthesize histamine. In the nervous system, where it passes on its most important
messages, histamine is called a neurotransmitter. Each cell in the body is
connected to nerve cells; therefore histamine messages reach each cell and
affect its functioning.
Every substance in the body carries its own specific information. For
instance, adrenalin mobilizes defensive mechanisms of the body, while insulin
is responsible for the carbohydrate metabolism. Histamine’s scope of activity
is inconceivably wide. Indeed, histamine “regulates (!) various activities of the
brain, such as the arousal state, brain energy metabolism, locomotor activity,
neuro-endocrine, autonomic and vestibular functions, feeding, drinking, sexual
behaviour and analgesia (pain).” 5 This means that when we sleep or wake up,
move, think, feel pain, eat, make love, etc. histamine is active passing its
messages, which will vary depending on the organ’s or tissue’s function.

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Immune Mechanisms

Another theoretical work that covers the multiple areas of histamine
activity emphasizes that “histamine proved to be important for the immune
homeostasis.”6 Since balanced immunity signifies health, this knowledge from
the basic sciences confirms that not only the allergy-related functions of the
immune system depend on histamine, but also its general functioning. It logically follows, that an imbalanced production of histamine must inevitably
affect the above-named functions, and such symptoms as insomnia, or excessive fatigue, joint and muscle pains, poor vascular tone, low libido, and even
general weakening of the immunity are a possibility.
Basic science teaches that histamine not only participates in numerous
functions, but regulates many of them. If we develop this idea further, it logically follows that by blocking its activity with medications such as the antihistamines or the highly popular antacids (which are antihistamines for gastrointestinal
disorders), we inevitably disrupt all the above-listed functions. Did you know
that? I bet you didn’t even though you may have consumed some of these
drugs and possibly also experienced their side effects. Your doctor may not
know about the regulatory properties of histamine because he or she was not
taught about the scope of histamine activity, but was taught simply to
prescribe antihistamines and antacids. Doctors generally know histamine
only as an “evil” mediator of allergy, which, being spilled from mast cells,
initiates and conducts pro-disease messages among the cells participating in
allergic reactions. They also know that histamine excess leads to excessive
secretion of gastric acid. Therefore, for doctors who are taught this limited
view, histamine suppression seems the right thing to do.

HISTAMINE IS AN AUTACOID
The word autacoid comes from the Greek autos—self and akos—remedy or
medicine. There are several autacoids, such as adrenalin, a powerful hormone
that increases blood pressure, accelerates the heart rate, etc. Then there is
serotonin, familiar to migraine and depression sufferers, since its imbalance
leads to these conditions. Too much adrenalin can be fatal; at the same time,
synthetic adrenalin saves lives in critical situations. Autacoids are substances
of bifocal activity: too much can be harmful, as can be too little. Not all
medical dictionaries list the word autacoid, but if you are lucky to find it, you
will read that histamine is an autacoid as well. Strangely, in the same dictionaries, the entry for the word histamine will not mention its remedial properties.

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22 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

In a few old textbooks this positive aspect of histamine is mentioned. Today,
most textbooks emphasize only its disease-promoting activity in allergies,
migraine headaches or production of gastric acidity
istamine is a
and the need to suppress this activity. This is so despite
substance produced
the fact that histamine is a substance of dual effect,
by all of the body’s cells.
as is, for instance, adrenalin also.
It participates in
Something is wrong: Why does standard medicine
numerous functions and
fight histamine’s excessive activity with drugs? Why
regulates many.
does it pretend that the only role for histamine is a
Histamine transmits
negative one when, in fact, it belongs to the family of
numerous vital messages, autacoids? How can the substance contained in all cells
without which our body
of healthy (!) people be considered so hazardous to the
would not be able to
body? What is wrong with Mother Natures’ design?
function. It is crucial for
the proper work of the
HISTAMINE HOMEOSTASIS
immune and nervous
Allergy and related diseases are conditions caused by
systems that regulate the the initiation of inappropriate histamine release and
functioning of the rest of activity. This does not make histamine a harmful
the body. Despite this
chemical, since it is an inherent part of life and organ
fact, medical textbooks
functioning. It is the imbalanced release and unconmostly avoid mentioning
trolled activity of this substance that become harmful.
histamine, and when they The overspill means that the switches that control
do present it, they dwell
histamine release are inefficient.
solely on its allergyThe existence of such switches is evident from the
contributing properties.
way a healthy body extinguishes an acute allergic reacThis justifies the use of
tion. Here is an example of how it happens. Exposure to
numerous medications
an allergenic food or a strong smell may occasionally
that block its activity
provokes mast cells’ degranulation in a healthy host.
which results in the
The tissues full of these cells are the first to respond
disruption of numerous
with symptoms—hives, itchy eyes, a congested nose,
vital functions.
etc. This signals that the impact was too strong even for

H

the healthy self-regulatory switches, and they were
unable to turn off the histamine leakage. However, the disruption of their
otherwise normal functioning is brief, the body’s chemistry shifts to a diseasecontributing mode only for a short period. If the patient does not want to
put up with these temporary symptoms, he may take an antihistamine. At
some point, the receptors regain their ability to turn off the flood, and the

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Immune Mechanisms

symptoms stop. The body was able to reverse the
disease on its own.
Things are different in a hypersensitive patient.
There is no effective turn-off, therefore the reaction
lingers and may progress due to a shift towards
pro-disease chemistry. Something is permanently
wrong with the protective regulatory mechanisms
in the immune system, and this defect maintains the
symptoms. Now the patient may be forced to turn
to a never-ending, pill-swallowing regime.
It is clear that in allergy patients, histamine turnoff receptors need help to be able to establish homeostatic production. Only the restoration of receptor
functioning may end allergy symptoms and save the
patient from daily medications. Despite the fact that
receptor repair would be of much more benefit,
allergy medicine recognizes only the blocking
approach: it either inhibits the functioning of the
healthy receptors, or suppresses the activity of the cells
totally. In either case, the effect is temporary, since it
does not correct the prime defect.

23

istamine is a
substance of dual
activity. It does cause
allergy as well as some
other disorders, but only
when it is released
excessively. More
important is the fact
that histamine is
responsible for
messages of health
among the cells. By
originally including
histamine into the group
of autacoids, science
recognized its healing
properties. By excluding
it now, the medical
profession has distorted
scientific fact. Silence
about the vital role of
histamine for the functioning of the whole
body and its curative
ability is of special
concern in clinical
immunology and allergy
where histamine is
of overwhelming
importance.

H

HISTAMINE RECEPTORS
Histamine-synthesizing cells have not one but several
kinds of histamine receptors that regulate its synthesis
and release. They are marked by the letter H that stands
for histamine and numbers that denote their type. We
will speak mostly about three kinds of histamine receptors and just mention the forth, although science has
identified more. All four receptors—H1, H2, H3, H4—
are important in passing numerous histamine
messages. Since H receptors operate with the substance that participates and
regulates numerous immune and neurological functions, these functions
depend on the efficiency of these receptors. In allergy, H1 receptors are turn-on
switches for histamine synthesis and release. H2 and H3 receptors are off
switches. Only when H2/3 receptors are deficient, the normal H1 receptors
become disease-promoting tools because they contribute to the histamine

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24 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

release. In the areas other than allergies, the application
of these receptors is different and is not discussed in this
book. H4 receptor generates and activates immunocompetent cells in allergy and other diseases.
The H1 receptor type was discovered over half a
century ago. The role of these receptors in the excessive
production of histamine has been studied thoroughly
and described in all textbooks.
H2 receptors were discovered by James Black, a
Nobel Prize winner. These receptors are fairly well
described by basic science, but practicing physicians
are only taught their role in excessive gastric acid
production, while their central immunoregulatory role
in allergies, asthma and other immune-related diseases
is almost always excluded from the program.
H3 receptors were discovered on nerve cells in 1983
by the French neurophysiologist J. Arrang and a team
of European scientists. Later on, these receptors were
identified on other cells, including immunocompentent cells. I doubt that the neuro- and immunoregulatory role of these receptors is known to most practicing
physicians.
The H4 receptor was first described by D. G. Raible
and his colleagues in 1994. This receptor plays a major
role in bone marrow activity. The H4 receptor is vital
for the production of immunocompetent cells and
hence, the functioning of the immune system. Standard
medical textbooks generally do not contain any information on this receptor.
A Canadian research team working in the Winnipeg
cancer institute discovered another class, namely the
intracellular receptor H1C that delivers histamine
messages to the heart of each cell’s genetic material.7
From a paper sent to me by a renowned American immunologist, I learned
about the existence of yet another type, Hx receptor. With time, still more
histamine receptors may be identified. The existence of multiple histamine
receptors, each of which mediates different cellular functions, indicates the

ike any substance,
histamine overproduction is controlled in a
healthy body by certain
turn-off receptors. If
these receptors are
inefficient, the exaggerated histamine release
leads to the prevalence
of histamine-induced
disease-promoting
chemistry, and hence,
allergy symptoms characteristic for the tissues
and organs in which the
flood occurs. The two
options an allergy
patient has are: a)
medications that either
inactivate the work of
the healthy turn-on
receptors or suppress
all the activity of the
cellular lab; b) repair of
the inefficient turn-off
receptors in order to
enable them to control
the leakage. Conventional
allergy medicine prefers
the blocking approach
with its temporary
effect.

L

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Immune Mechanisms

importance of the substance whose messages they
conduct.
All immunocompetent and nerve cells, those of the
vascular walls and the endocrine glands, indeed, the
cells of all regulatory systems, synthesize histamine,
and thus they have histamine receptors. The distribution and functional activity of all H receptors are the
central factor that determines the release of histamine
by different cells. This release affects the work of
numerous organs and systems, and when impaired,
manifests in various physiological and clinical effects.

25

istamine production
and activity are
regulated by stimulatory
and inhibitory receptors
marked with the letter
H. By now, several kinds
of H receptors have
been discovered and
their mode of action
established as different
in different organs. The
fact is that clinical textbooks tend only to
contain information that
leads to the production
of medications that
block stimulatory H1

H

H1-SWITCH VS. H2/3 SWITCH
All H receptors are meant to respond primarily to
histamine. In allergy, H1-receptors are responsible for
the symptoms. They are activated by the histamine
present in the extracellular space and signal the
cellular lab to generate histamine. The body moder- receptors; they do not
ates histamine release through H2/3 receptors. Their contain information on
messages are opposite to the H1-receptor messages. the healthy regulatory
When the messages of H1 receptors are counterbal- effects on the nervous
anced by the messages of H2/3 receptors, histamine is and immune systems
produced in the amount needed for the normal func- through the role of the
tioning of the tissues, such as cellular growth, wound H2/3 receptors.
healing, muscular and vascular tone, pain reduction,
proper hormone production, etc. If H2 and H3 receptors are inefficient, as it
is in allergy, histamine liberation becomes excessive. This results in the prevalence of disease-promoting chemistry, and the areas especially rich in mast
cells—the lungs, skin, gut and brain—respond with symptoms specific to
them. Histamine overactivity involves all cells possessing histamine receptors.
The more histamine receptors the cell has, the greater its involvement.
Histamine surplus has a negative effect on neighboring cells, and they start to
generate disease-oriented chemistry. This amplifies the pathological process,
and creates a situation where the strong H1-receptor messages prevail, and
thereby maintain allergy symptoms.
The inactivity of H2/3 receptors turns normal H1 receptors into the target
for the main allergy medications, antihistamines. Substances that inactivate

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26 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

receptor response are called antagonists, and antihistamines are H1-receptor
antagonists. Antihistamines immobilize H1 receptors for the period they
circulate in the body; that is, until excreted, and then, another dose of the
drug is needed to keep H1 receptors under control. A negative side of antihistamines is that, while they circulate in the bloodstream, all the health-promoting
histamine messages are inhibited: wound healing slows down, vascular tone
weakens, the brain loses its clarity, etc.
Two questions arise: 1. Why are H2/3 receptors weak and unable to provide
the balanced release of histamine? 2. Is it possible to boost the efficiency of
these receptors? I will try to answer both.
istamine release is
induced through H1
TWO WAYS TO CONTROL ALLERGY
receptors, while H2 and
Nature programmed the body, and especially the
H3 receptors inhibit its
immune system, to function in such a way that any negarelease. Thus, in allergy,
tive effect could be easily counteracted. In relation to
H1 are on-switches, and
histamine balance, this is so unless there is an inherited
H2/3 are off-switches.
or acquired error in the genes responsible for the formaAllergy symptoms occur
tion and/or activity of H2/3 receptors. Due to an error,
when the off-switches
these receptors may be underdeveloped, inefficient
are unable to turn off
and/or scarce. If the error is minor, histamine release will
the histamine release,
be slightly in excess, and the bearers of the deficient
and the leakage
receptors may experience negligible symptoms. At some
continues unabated.
point, a seemingly irrelevant event or simply a time
factor may reinforce the genetic defect and make it
obvious through a full-blown allergic condition.
Medicine knows that the blocking effect of H1-antihistamines is, at best
short-lived and that they are required on a regular basis. Medicine also knows
that suppression of any cellular functioning for extended periods of time is
highly undesirable because of the potential health hazards. Logic tells us that the
only effective and safe way to control histamine release is to activate the H2/3 receptors, and enable them to perform their natural function. Moreover, basic science
provides us with the additional knowledge that the H1 receptor, proclaimed as
“bad” in allergy, is not solely allergy-oriented, but is also protective: it assists the
H2 receptor in its protective activity. This confirms the opinion of a number of
research teams who found that H1-antihistamines, designed to block the
receptor’s activity, “might not be ideal therapeutic strategy” since they also
inhibit normal histamine metabolism.8

H

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Immune Mechanisms

Can we correct the receptor functioning with the
presence of the faulty genes that govern it? Can we do
this without invasive genetic interference? Yes, we can.
Let us see how it can be done.

27

hen the off receptors, H2 and H3, are

W

genetically defective
and/or scarce, there is
little or no opposition to
the normal H1 receptors,
and histamine release
turns into a flood.
Histamine excess causes
the production of prodisease chemistry by
the participating cells.
The tissues full of
histamine-induced
chemistry respond with
corresponding allergy
symptoms. The two ways
to treat patients are:
1) temporarily control
histamine release by
blocking H1 receptors
and provide symptomatic relief; 2) activate
H2 and H3 receptors and
fix the problem.
Continual blocking
disrupts normal functioning of the tissues
with H1-receptor-bearing

CELLULAR AND SYNTHETIC HISTAMINE
Exercise develops muscles, and similarly, activation
strengthens receptors. The scientific term for substance
that activates receptors is agonist. In nature, strengthening of the inefficient H2/3 receptors occurs through
histamine. Its synthetic version has been available for
almost a century. Can it be used for activation? Yes, it
can. In this connection, questions arise:
■ If extracellular histamine keeps H1 receptors active
all the time, why can’t it activate H2/3 receptors?
■ If synthetic histamine can activate the inefficient
H2/3 receptors, what is the difference between
synthetic histamine and our body’s histamine?
Let us start by looking at the difference between
histamine found in our cells and the one in the
commercially available form. To establish the potency
of a drug, one measures its level in the blood and
tissues. All substances in the body start to break down
and are metabolized after a certain amount of time.
The time it takes for half of the drug to be metabolized
is known as its half-life. So, the half-life of an antihistamine determines how many hours apart a tablet
should be taken. The difference between the half-life of
natural histamine in our cells and its drug version is
cells, and this makes
the most important distinguishing fact between them.
Unfortunately, medical textbooks almost never activation of the weak
explain the difference between the two. In fact, although receptor more logical.
both are called histamine, they are far from being identical in terms of their action in the body. Intracellular histamine is stored in the
granules of mast cells and basophils for about three weeks. Being released into
extracellular space, it disintegrates within few minutes. In a healthy body,
histamine release is smooth, and its much-needed messages spread all over the

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28 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

body. In a sick person, it leaks excessively, which leads to an allergic reaction.
Although the spilled histamine is metabolized within minutes, the constantly
cracking granules of mast cells and basophils maintain its high levels in the
tissues. Moreover, this exaggerated leakage provokes the manufacture, or
synthesis, of additional histamine, particularly by other
immunocompetent cells, T-cells which begin to make
ynthetic histamine
more and more of it as well. This increases the amount
differs fundamentally
of histamine in the extracellular space and thereby
from the cellular chemcauses a whole cascade of illness-contributing chemical. It has a short halfistry. This is like gasoline being poured over a smollife, its concentration is
dering fire—it “inflames” the affected tissues. Indeed,
very low, and it is indethe term that describes the process is inflammation.
pendent of the diseaseSuch inflammation has nothing to do with an infection;
promoting chemistry.
it is a tissue reaction to the cascade of pro-disease
Injected histamine
chemicals.
cannot produce and
Synthetic histamine differs from its natural cellular
maintain the state of
chemical counterpart in several aspects. First, mandisease the way cellular
made histamine is usually employed in a diluted form
histamine can.
and can, therefore, be much less concentrated than the
natural substance. Second, injected histamine is an
“uncombined” isolated substance, which means it is a foreigner in the chemical soup simmering in the tissues. It is like a new log thrown into a fire, and
time is required for it to start burning. But, actually, there is no time for that:
although the half-life of both cellular and synthetic histamine is only a few
minutes the injected drug breaks down completely, whereas the immensely
exaggerated liberation of cellular histamine goes on due to the continuous
degranulation. Just compare the impact of a few minutes of man-made lowdose histamine with the incessant oozing of histamine from mast
cells/basophils. These qualitative and quantitative aspects explain why the
synthetic chemical cannot lead to a disease the way the body’s histamine can.

S

H1- AND H2/3 -RECEPTOR RESPONSE TO CELLULAR
AND SYNTHETIC HISTAMINE
Synthetic histamine cannot lead to disease, but can it lead to recovery? Yes.
Receptors respond differently to cellular and injected histamine. Theoretically,
both kinds should activate all histamine receptors—H1, H2 and H3, but this is
not the case. When H2/3 receptors are deficient, the pro-inflammatory chemistry

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Immune Mechanisms

is too overwhelming for them. However, they discern the isolated mild signal of
the injected histamine amid the frenzy of the pro-disease signals and respond to
it by getting more active. A signal enables them to turn off the H1-tap. We may
compare the weak H2/3 receptors with a child who passes by a huge rock that
looks like a mountain for him, but picks up a small stone. The healthy H1 receptors “feel comfortable” within the milieu full of histamine and histaminetriggered pro-inflammatory mediators; a small dose of the injected histamine
will not be strong enough to incite them to adverse activity. This is why we
achieve the H2/3 effect by injecting small doses of histamine.
To see how both kinds of histamine work, let us take asthma as an example.
The lung tissue, if spread out, would occupy an area the size of a tennis court.
The lungs have the largest number of mast cells and basophils, the main
producers of histamine. Add to this the disease-promoting chemistry induced
by the initial spill. Now, compare this “ocean” with a small amount of histamine
in a syringe. Not only the small dose of diluted synthetic histamine is too mild
to activate H1 receptors, but its half-life is only a few minutes—time not sufficient to unleash, not to say sustain, a disease process. However, the time and the
dose are enough to activate H2/3 receptors and hence, lead to the production of
pro-health chemistry by all participating cells. The protective H2/3 effect
opposes the H1 effect exactly in the way a healthy body does. Even though
medicine operates mostly by measuring and crunching numbers to establish
what is less than normal, and what is beyond the range of the normal, qualitative effects may be more important in regulatory diseases than mere measured
quantities. In allergy, it is not so much the amount of the opposing chemistry that
reverses the disease process, but the regulatory potency of the newly introduced
mediators. For an asthma patient, it means relief of the symptoms.
The degree of the improvement varies and depends on the functional
resilience of these receptors and the degree of their original deficiency. The
exact concentrations of histamine which activate only H2 receptors and
control H1-receptor activation (from 10–9 M to l0–4M) have been scientifically established.9 The H2/3 receptors react synergistically, which means they
are more effective when working together, and the H3 receptors are sensitive
to even lower doses of synthetic histamine.
Within a few minutes, the injected histamine starts breaking down and leaves
behind only its stimulatory effect. Like a pendulum that swings for some time
after it is released, the weak receptors temporarily continue their natural function
of turning off histamine leakage. The length and degree of their activation

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30 THE PLOT AGAINST ALLERGY PATIENTS

ontinuous and
excessive histamine
spillage from the cells
that have inefficient
H2/3 receptors (“off

C

switches”) produces
mostly unopposed H1
effect, and this maintains histamine leakage
and the disease state.
Synthetic histamine,
with its short half-life,
much lower concentrations and independence
of the pro-disease
chemistry, produces
only a mild signal, which
leaves H1 receptors

cannot be determined by any test; they become clearly
evident through observation of the patient during the
course of treatment. The judgment is clinical, which
means it is based on observed and reported improvement. Through careful observation, a doctor quickly
gains experience on how to gauge the dose that would
provide further stimuli to keep the H2/3 receptors
active. Since histamine injections involve all the H2/3receptor-bearing cells, the tissues containing these cells
improve their functioning. The change of the symptoms after each injection is the indicator what organs
are involved in the disease. Similar to an exercise
program, repeated histamine injections strengthen the
receptors and enable them to oppose the negative H1receptor effect.

THE BIAS AGAINST HISTAMINE RECEPTORS IN
ALLERGY MEDICINE
unresponsive, but stimuBias in the description of the H1 and H2/3 receptors in
lates the weak receptors
allergy and related diseases is obvious: while H1
receptor is described in detail, the role of H2 and H3
which are sensitive to
receptors in allergy is virtually absent from medical
H2 and H3 receptors.
Activation of H2/3 recepsources of the ’90s. Most of the commercially available
tors counterbalances or
allergy medications are designed to block the activity of
reduces the diseasethe H1 receptors. All antihistamines are such medicapromoting H1-receptor
tions. Description of the H2 receptors is also drugeffect. Repeated stimuoriented and limited to their role in blocking excessive
lation strengthens H2/3
gastric secretions, which promote the use of the H2receptors and enables
receptor blockers. Yet, the knowledge exists that H2them to balance the
receptor activation may enable the immune system to
cellular production.
control allergy without medications. Similarly, the selfinhibiting features of histamine could also help in
certain gastrointestinal disorders, and this will be discussed later in the book.
But making this scientific data widely known would go against the interests of the
drug industry. It is no secret that the medical elite is closely connected with
drug developers and depends on them for most of their research funding.10
This explains why the curative H2-receptor effect in allergy is not common

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Immune Mechanisms

knowledge. The H3-receptor effect is also kept in the theoretical domain even
though both animal testing and trials on humans are very promising.

HISTAMINE: THEORY AND PRACTICE
Histamine was first synthesized by two German chemists, A. Windhause
and W. Vogt in 1907, and its physiological activity was discovered by Sir
Henry Dale and P. Laidlaw in 1910. Shortly afterhe histaminewards it was empirically used as a drug for asthma
inhibiting ability of
and allergies. Over all these years, histamine has
fascinated physicians as a naturally occurring chem- the H2/3 receptors is
ical and as a medication. During Sir Henry Dale’s obscured in the allergy
time, a Histamine Club was formed to unite those literature and virtually
scientists and doctors who studied and/or used never applied in prachistamine. In the ’60s, with the establishment of tice, primarily because
allergy as a medical branch, interest was channeled in of the financial interests
involved in the widethree directions:
spread sales of numerous
a) allergists were busy with presenting histamine in its
medications designed
negative light only, developing antihistamines to
only to block histamine
suppress it and advertising their drugs;
activity.
b) researchers, using animal and