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Hot air : the (mostly) true story of the first hot-air balloon ride

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Year:
2020
Language:
english
File:
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2

Der Stuermer - 1941 Nr. 25

Language:
french
File:
PDF, 21.93 MB
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To Laika

Atheneum Books for Young Readers
An imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division
1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York 10020
Copyright © 2005 by Marjorie Priceman
All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form.
Book design by Jessica Sonkin
The text for this book is set in Celestia Antiqua.
Manufactured in China
First Edition
10 987654321
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Priceman, Marjorie.
Hot air : the (mostly) true story of the first hot-air balloon ride / Marjorie Priceman.— 1st ed.
p. cm.
“An Anne Schwartz book.”
ISBN 0-689-82642-7
x. Balloon ascensions—France—Versailles—History. 2. Montgolfier, Jacques-Etienne, 1745-1799.
3. Montgolfier, Joseph-Michel, 1740-1810.1. Title.
TL62D.M66P75 2005
/ ’ \
*
629.133’22’0929—dc22
. 2.004014743

XVi) TRUE STORY OF TJJ g ^
5XRST HOT-AIR BALLOo

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Marjorie
yticeman

An Anne Schwartz Book • Atheneum Books for Young Readers • New York • London • Toronto • Sydney

JLhousands of people have come
to watch an incredible experiment
at the palace of Versailles in France
Ah, Versailles! 700 rooms! 67
staircases! 15 fountains! 2,000 acres
of manicured gardens! Too many
chandeliers, paintings, and gold
bathtubs to count!
But enough about that.

What a crowd has assembled! Scientists, schoolchildren,
opera singers, and architects. Noblemen, farmers, and
one famous pastry chef Even the American ambassador,
Benjamin Franklin, is here. And, of course, King Louis
XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette.
But enough about them.

The demonstration is
about to begin! After
months of work and many
sleepless nights, the amateur
inventors Joseph and
Etienne Montgolfier are
ready to test an exciting new
kind of transportation—the
hot-air balloon.

So, never mind the
important people and
splendid surroundings.
Pay no attention to that
little dog or that lady with

Look, instead, at the
basket a; ttached by slender
ropes to the balloon now
rising high above the
crowd.
Inside that basket are
ballooning’s first brave
passengers....

and a rooster.

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JLlappiness and joy! An historic event!
Our brave aviators, who have touched
down in the woods at Vaucresson, are
found in fine fluff and feather and carried
back to Versailles. There they are greeted
with flowers, song, and better food
than usual.
But enough about that.
You may be wondering, did this really
happen? Well, yes—sort of. The Montgolfiers
were real people who are considered the
inventors of the hot-air balloon and the
fathers of aviation. The September 19,1783,
balloon flight with barnyard animal
passengers is a matter of historical
•

record. But the details of the flight may
or may not be true. The author heard

*

this part of the story from a duck, who
heard it from a sheep, who heard it from
a rooster a long, long time ago.

nfiQYGROUE COLLEGE

A BRIEF HISTORY JOIT

°°°“3I!

^

J^FIERS’ BALLOONS

, l—Avignon, France
Joseph Montgolfier ran his family’s paper company,
but at heart he was a dreamer and inventor. One
evening he watched smoke from the fire carry bits of
ash up the chimney, and he wondered: Can smoke
lift other objects?*

Using materials at hand, he made a box by
stretching fabric on a thin wooden frame,
leaving an opening at the bottom. He then lit
some twists of paper and held them at the
opening, filling the box with hot, smoky air.
Much to his delight, the contraption lifted off
the table and floated up to the ceiling.

December 14,1782—Annonay
Together the Montgolfier brothers repeated
the experiment outdoors with a model three
times the size of the original. It floated away,
landing in a distant field.

—

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June 4,1783—Annonay
A public exhibition of the new larger and rounder
device. To combat the cool, wet weather, a brazier
was attached to the balloon. On landing, the brazier
tipped and set the balloon on fire. The flight was a
great success nonetheless and news reached Paris.
The Academy of Science invited the Montgolfiers
to demonstrate their invention for the king
at Versailles.

\

/
/
.U—7—r~A—4-

September 12,1783—Paris

Before its test run, the Versailles balloon was soaked
and shredded by wind and rain. A disaster! Even so,
the king insisted the demonstration would be held
the following week.

September 19,1783—Versailles

In four sleepless days and nights the Montgolfiers
and a team of craftsmen produced another balloon.
It was fifty-seven feet high and forty-one feet in
diameter and weighed 1,596 pounds—plus another
900 pounds for a basket, a duck, a sheep, and a
rooster. Their flight lasted eight minutes, reached
a height of fifteen hundred feet, and traveled a
little more than two miles.

The animals were found unharmed by balloon
enthusiast Pilatre de Rozier, who, along with
the Marquis d’Arlandes on November 21,1783,
would fly on the first “manned” balloon flight.

* The Montgolfiers thought that smoke was the force that
lifted their balloons. Years later it was discovered that hot air
rises because it weighs less than cool air.

Hot-air ballooning’s
did what
no human could,
went where no human would,
human had
But how could this be?
Meet them and find out
/.j

ISBN 0-689-82642-7

51695

9 780689 826429

-'